2018 Washington County Extension Council - Front Row, left to right: Mary Ann Turner, Cassie Nickelson, John Held. Back Row, left to right: Jim Reed, Debbie Bays, Ben Boyer, Mark Stamelos, Carl Wilson. Not pictured: Jim Cresswell, Marvin & Judy Wright, T.R. Dudley, Jim Daughtery, Leisa Lewis.

 

 

2018 Washington County Extension Council Officers – Left to Right: Jim Reed, Debbie Bays, Ben Boyer. Not Pictured: Jim Cresswell

 

Managing Shade for Profitable Beef Production (PDF)

Wednesday, June 13, 2018 from 3:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Tour operation utilizing natural shade in rotationally grazed paddocks, learn how timber, forages and livestock are managed in an integrated system. Equipment display, portable breeding barn demonstration. Fee for participation, including meal, is $10 per person.

Contact Crawford County Extension by June 11 by phone (573 775 2135) or mail PO Box 190, Steelville MO 65565 to register.

 

Hitchhiking spotted lanternfly could become problem in Missouri

Source: Kevin Rice, 573-771-7386; Dean Volenberg, 573-882-0476

COLUMBIA, Mo. – An exotic pest that hitchhikes on train cars, trucks and boats could suck the life out Missouri crops.

Spotted lanternfly has the potential to establish populations in Missouri, says University of Missouri Extension field crop entomologist Kevin Rice. It damages soybean, corn and hops, as well as fruit and ornamental trees. According to MU Extension viticulturist Dean Volenberg, it could have damaging effects on Missouri’s 1,700 acres of grapes, its primary host.

Adult lanternflies are active in June and July. Entomologists reported seeing the spotted lanternfly in Pennsylvania in 2014. It has appeared since then in Virginia, Delaware and New York.

The plant hopper likes to lay its eggs on smooth, metal surfaces such as those found on train cars, boats and tractor-trailers. Its honeydew secretions attract other pests. It leaves weeping wounds as it feeds.

The adult lanternfly’s forewing is gray with black spots. The wingtips are black blocks outlined in gray. It has distinctive bright orange-red and white underwings, but it appears less vibrant and may be difficult to see when its wings are not spread, Volenberg says.

It likes fall feeding on Ailanthus altissima, also known as tree of heaven, a medium-sized invasive tree with stout branches that spread to form an open, wide crown. Its flowers are showy and fragrant and it tolerates drought. The tree also enables the ailanthus webworm moth.

What to do if you spot lanternflies

• Do not kill it. The insect contains cantharidin, the same toxic chemical found in the blister beetle.

• Capture it if you can. Lanternflies are jumpers.

• Take a photograph of it. Email to ricekev@missouri.edu.

• Collect a specimen and put it in a vial filled with alcohol to preserve it.

• Take it to your county extension center and note where you found it. GPS coordinates are helpful. The extension center will send it to Rice, who will track its spread in Missouri.

• Use caution when handling tree of heaven; its sap can cause headaches, nausea and possible heart problems, according to Penn State Extension.

Sign up for free pest alerts from MU Extension’s Integrated Pest Management program at ipm.missouri.edu/pestMonitoring.

 

USDA Hog Trappers

Washington and Iron Counties - Eli Holmes (573)778-6864

Crawford County - Wesley Persicke (573)263-0529

 

Private Pesticide Training

This will be an opportunity for you to recertify or become certified for a Private Applicator License. If you engage in application of restricted-use pesticides for the purpose of producing an agricultural commodity on property you or your employer owns, or rent without compensation other than trading of personal services between producers of agricultural commodities you are considered a private applicator. You can take the training in our office by watching a 2.5 hour private pesticide applicator training video. To schedule a time to take the training in our office please call 573-438-2671

 

Missouri Land Grant Q&A PDF

 

2017 Farmer's Tax Guides -- Now Available at University of Missouri Extension Offices

With the new year upon us, 'tis the season for taxes. To help farmer's navigate tax preparation, the IRS publishes a "Farmer;s Tax Guide". The publication explains how the federal tax laws apply to farming and serves as a guide to figure your taxes and complete your 2016 farm tax return. Also included in the publication are administrative and law changes for 2016. To obtain a copy of "Farmer's Tax Guide -- Publication 225". visit your local University of Missouri Extension Office.

 

 

Upcoming Events in Washington County

April

  • April 6 -- Hay Production, Wurdack Farm
  • April 20 -- SMS Heifer Sale, Farmington Livestock Auction
  • April 19 -- Council Meeting, Washington County Library
  • April 19 -- Part One of Selling Local Foods
  • April 24 -- Managing Forest Resources
  • April 26 -- Blackberry Workshop, Farmington Library
  • April 26 -- Part Two of Selling Local Foods

May

  • May 7-8 -- Intensive Grazing School, Mineral Area College
  • May 8 -- Truman Day, Office Closed
  • May 10 -- Computer Basic Class, Washington County Library
  • May 17 -- Council Meeting, Washington County Library
  • May 17 -- Computer Basic Class, Washington County Library
  • May 18-19 -- Cattle A.I. School, Farmington Auction Barn
  • May 28 -- Memorial Day, Office Closed

June

  • June 21 -- Council Meeting, Washington County Library

July

  • July 12-14 -- Ste. Genevieve County Fair
  • July 19 -- Council Meeting, Washington County Fair
  • July 31-August 5 -- St. Francois County Fair

August

  • August 7-11 -- Washington County Fair
  • August 9-19 -- Missouri State Fair