Crop scouting reports

Crop scouting is an essential part of integrated pest management (IPM). Scouting programs are designed to protect and maximize crop yield and quality while minimizing the risk associated with pesticide use. 

Each week, an extension agronomy specialist scouts fields in Barton County and then report their findings through an automated phone service and email message. The message will go out to everyone signed up for the program.

The weekly field scouting report is sponsored by University of Missouri Extension and Barton County Extension.  To receive the 2018 weekly scouting reports, print the Crop Scouting Enrollment Form, complete and return with payment to Barton County Extension, 801 E 12th, Lamar, MO 64759 or contact the MU Extension Center in Barton County, 417-682-3579.

The cost of the program is only $35 per phone number, $95 for three numbers and $30 per phone number for those with four or more. 

Crop Scouting Enrollment Form (PDF)

Current weekly report

March 28

Hello, this is Jill Scheidt, MU Extension agronomy specialist with your March 28th crop update.

Fields were checked near Verdella, northwest of Lamar.

Wheat was in the green-up stage. Weed pressure was moderately high in fields with thinner stands. Henbit was already flowered and chickweed was starting to grow or flowered. If chickweed and henbit are flowered out, viable seed has already been dropped. Generally, weeds compete for light, nutrients and water the most during the vegetative stage.

If flooding occurs, 3 main factors affect the extent of damage: water temperature, amount of water motion during the flood and the duration of the flood. Warm water temperatures and still water increase respiration and deplete oxygen faster. Other conditions influence extent of damage, but generally, plants cannot tolerate more than 36-48 hours of submersion. The plant is more likely to survive if the growing point is above water.

According to University of Nebraska, survivability of seeds varies among varieties, but generally can survive 4 days. Longer flooding can result in lower yields, especially if nitrogen is lost. If soils become crusted, emergence will also be reduced.

https://extension2.missouri.edu/agw1014

https://cropwatch.unl.edu/corn-and-soybean-survival-saturated-and-flooded-soils

According to the MU Weather Station in Lamar, the 2-inch bare soil temperature was 56 degrees Fahrenheit on Monday, March 26th at 3:00 pm.

Call 417-682-3579 for more information. If you have not paid the $35 to renew your subscription, this will be your last update. Remit $35 to Barton County Extension at 801 E 12th in Lamar to renew. Thank you.

 

March 21

Scheidt scouting fields near Golden City on March 21. She found wheat was in the tillering to green-up stage.

“Green-up stage is identified by the beginning of erect growth of leaves and main tiller. Nitrogen should be added soon for most efficient uptake. Livestock should be removed at this time if a grain crop is to be produced. Once wheat begins to joint, the head moves up the stem and is more easily damaged by equipment and livestock,” said Scheidt.

 

No aphids were seen, but Scheidt recommends to continue scouting.

 

“As temperatures warm, aphids are more likely to be found on leaves. Begin scouting in lush areas in the field, as aphids prefer to take cover in thicker areas of growth,” said Scheidt.

 

According to the MU weather station in Lamar, Missouri, the two-inch bare soil temperature was 48 degrees Fahrenheit at 11:30 am on March 21.

 

March 14

THIS WEEK’S WHEAT REPORT

 

Scheidt scouting fields west of Lamar on March 14. She found wheat was in the tillering to green-up stage.

 

No aphids were present. However, continue to scout for them by looking near the crowns at the base of the plant and soil surface. Aphids are usually not active in temperatures below 60 degrees Fahrenheit,” said Scheidt.

 

The best time to add nitrogen to wheat is at the first joint stage. Plant growth increases during this time, so nitrogen is most efficiently used.

 

Not many weeds were present in this field during scouting.

 

 “If raising a grain crop, remove grazing livestock before joint in order to prevent damage to the developing head, which is visible by splitting the stem in half during the joint stage,” said Scheidt.

“Some wheat had purple tips, due to cooler temperatures. This discoloration should fade as temperatures warm,” said Scheidt.

Scheidt observed a little septoria on leaves; a common disease identified by brown lesions with black fungus, or pycnidia, in the center of the lesion. Septoria is caused during warm, prolonged wet conditions. “It is a common disease and usually doesn’t require treatment,” said Scheidt.

According to the MU weather station in Barton County, the two-inch bare soil temperature was 35 degrees Fahrenheit at 8:30 am on March 13.

 

March 7

Time to Subscribe to MU Extension Weekly Field Crop Scouting Report for Southwest Missouri

 

LAMAR, Mo. – This is the seventh year for a field crop scouting program designed to help busy farmers with pest management efforts.

 

An agronomy specialist with MU Extension scouts fields weekly then shares the findings through an automated phone service to program subscribers. Fields are scouted in Barton, Jasper, Newton, Dade, Cedar and Greene counties.

 

The weekly scouting report is delivered to any subscriber telephone number or email address.

 

“Communicating with producers quickly is a challenge. Farmers today cover so much ground it is hard for them to stay on top of pests as they arrive each season.  A simple phone message stating what we are seeing, how to scout for it and control options enables the producer with the skills to identify a pest and make a decision on whether or not to treat,” said Scheidt.

 

Crop scouting is an essential part of integrated pest management (IPM).  Scouting programs are designed to protect crop yield and quality while minimizing risk associated with pesticide use. 

 

“Our weekly scouting report will be a reminder for farmers that they may also need to check their fields or it may remind them to contact a private crop scout,” said Scheidt.

 

However, Scheidt is quick to add that this unique weekly service is not designed to replace a farmers own scouting nor should it be used instead of hiring a professional crop scout. 

 

“It’s just another set of eyes, that is helping to monitor pests,” says Scheidt. 

 

The cost of the program is $35 per year.

 

For more information about the program, or to sign up for the program, contact Jill Scheidt at the Barton County Extension office, (417) 682-3579. 

 

THIS WEEK’S WHEAT REPORT

 

Scheidt scouting fields west of Iantha on March 7. She found wheat was in the tillering to green-up stage.

 

“No aphids were present. However, continue to scout for them by looking near the crowns at the base of the plant,” said Scheidt.

 

The best time to add nitrogen to wheat is at the first joint stage. Plant growth increases during this time, so nitrogen is most efficiently used.

 

Not many weeds were present in this field during scouting.

 

 “If a herbicide application is needed, be sure to check the stage of the wheat, as some herbicides cannot be sprayed after the joint stage,” said Scheidt. Read the pesticide label to ensure proper application.

Remove livestock form wheat before the joint stage if raising a grain crop.

 

According to the MU weather station in Barton County, the two-inch bare soil temperature was 47 degrees Fahrenheit at 12:00 pm on March 7.

 

MU Extension
University of Missouri Extension programs focus on the high-priority needs of Missourians to improve lives, communities and economies by providing relevant, responsive and reliable educational solutions. Each county extension center, with oversight by locally elected and appointed citizens, is your local link to practical education on almost anything. More information on this topic is available online at http://extension.missouri.edu.

Previous crop scouting reports

March 28 PDF

March 21 PDF

March 14 PDF

March 7 PDF

 

 

 

Links to other resources:

Recommended fungicides for stripe rust

University of Florida velvetbean caterpillar information

"Estimating Corn Grain Yield prior to Harvest"  (Purdue University

“Grain Fill Stages in Corn” article from Purdue University

2015 Pest Management Guide

Make the most from late planted soybean

Assessing soybean plant stands

 

Current soil temperatures in Lamar are updated every five minutes and can be found at http://agebb.missouri.edu/weather/realtime/lamar.asp